How to make your room feel bigger

How to make your room feel bigger

Space is at a premium in many homes, and we’re always looking for ways to make our rooms seem bigger. Many of us don’t have as much space as we’d like, but there are plenty of ways to cheat and create the illusion of a light, airy space, even in the smallest of homes. Here are some simple ways you can make your room feel bigger without making any structural changes.

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Arrange furniture creatively

Living rooms, in particular, can feel cramped with all the furniture we need, especially in family homes where several people will often be using the room at the same time.

After all, as the Mirror reports, Britain’s homes are getting smaller and smaller http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/britains-houses-getting-smaller–7459889, and this is piling pressure onto families or groups of friends who live together. You might have got into the habit of pushing all your large items of furniture up against the wall in an attempt to create as much floor space as possible. This can actually create the opposite effect and can make your room look and feel more cramped. If you can, pull sofas and armchair in a little from the walls, and you’ll create the illusion of more space. If you have enough space for people to walk between your furniture and the walls, even better.

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Use light colours

Using light colours, particularly on the walls and on the floor, creates the illusion of more space by opening up the room and making it feel brighter and lighter. Flooring can be a little harder than the walls, but wood or laminates are perfect for brightening up a room, as long as you choose the correct shades. Avoid any dark heavy oaks, as much as you might like them, and opt for a light beech colour or similar. Lighter oaks are also great and add a touch of timeless class to any space. Quality engineered oak flooring from reputable suppliers such as http://www.woodfloorwarehouse.co.uk/engineered-flooring.html can even add value to your home in some cases.

Dark colours can be cosy and can work well in small spaces if you want a dark, snug space, but if making a room seem bigger is your aim, avoid them. And light doesn’t have to mean white – if white is too harsh for your tastes or you prefer something warmer, choose a soft neutral.

 

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